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Subsidized Housing

If you live in B.C., have a low income and meet eligibility criteria, you may qualify for subsidized housing.

Subsidized housing is long-term housing for people who permanently reside in British Columbia. Rental fees are calculated on a rent geared to income basis (30% of household total gross income, subject to minimum rent based on # of people).

You may be eligible for subsidized housing if you can live independently and meet the household, residency, income and assets criteria. 

See our Glossary for help with definitions.

Downloads

Read through sections A-F to confirm your eligibility. See section 7. Questions (below) for additional information.

  • Family – Defined as a minimum of two people, including one dependent child. Who is considered a dependent child? An unmarried child, stepchild, adopted child or legal ward, mainly supported by the applicant, who is: ·        
    • Under 19 years of age; or ·        
    • Under 25 years of age and registered in full-time school, university or vocational institute which provides a recognized diploma, certificate, or degree; or
    • Of any age who, because of mental or physical infirmity, is accepted as a dependent for income tax purposes.
    • Please note: In The Housing Registry, some providers may have different criteria about what constitutes a dependent child.
  • Senior – Defined as a single person age 55 and older, or a couple where at least one person is age 55 or older*
  • People with disabilities – Those who can live independently and are in receipt of a recognized disability pension or are considered disabled for income tax purposes.   
  • Single people and couples – You are a single person, or a couple, with a low income and homeless, or at risk of homelessness. In addition, you do not meet the definitions of seniors or people with disabilities.

*Some housing providers using the Housing Registry may use a different age to define a senior.

See our Glossary for definitions.

Applicants must permanently reside in British Columbia when applying, and each member of the household must be one of the following:

  • Canadian citizen
  • Individual lawfully admitted into Canada for permanent residence
  • Refugee sponsored by the Government of Canada
  • Individual who has applied for refugee status

No adult members of the household can be under private sponsorship, except where BC Housing has accepted that private sponsorship has broken down. 

To be eligible for subsidized housing, the applicant’s gross household income must be below certain income limits, as established by the . HILs are determined by BC Housing from time to time, and represent the income required to pay the average market rent for an appropriately sized unit in the private market. Average market rents are derived from Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation’s Annual Rent Market Survey.

Exceptions:

  • Applicants from households with income over the HILs can be considered if the applicant is applying for developments with market rents or low end of market units.  
  • The Senior's Rental Housing program has different income* limits based on your location in the province.
    • Lower Mainland – $58,000
    • Southern BC – $57,000
    • Vancouver Island – $57,000
    • Northern BC – $47,000

*The income limit may be slightly lower in developments where the market rent is capped.

Over the income limit? Additional units are available for moderate income seniors or persons with disabilities. See Affordable Rental Housing.

National Occupancy Standards
The size of unit required by a household is governed by the National Occupancy Standards:

  1. There shall be no more than 2 or less than 1 person per bedroom.
  2. Spouses and couples share a bedroom.
  3. Parents do not share a bedroom with children.
  4. Dependants aged 18 or more do not share a bedroom.
  5. Dependants aged 5 or more of opposite sex do not share a bedroom.

The following guidelines are used when applying the National Occupancy Standards:

  • In recognition of a variety of co-parenting arrangements, a dependent child who resides with their parent(s) a minimum of 40 per cent of the time will qualify as a permanent member of the household when determining eligibility and appropriate unit size.
  • Single applicants (seniors or people with disabilities) are eligible to apply for bachelor and one-bedroom units.
  • Couples (two individuals) are only eligible to apply for one bedroom units, as they would be under-housed in a bachelor unit.
  • To maximize the use of limited one-bedroom units, priority for available one bedroom units is generally applied as follows:
    • Couples
    • Single applicants with a documented medical need for a one-bedroom unit
    • All other single applicants.

Housing Income Limits (HILs) for major centres in British Columbia
(Excerpt from the Housing Income Limits)

Region Bachelor 1 bedroom 2 bedroom 3 bedroom 4 bedroom
Abbotsford $26,500 $30,500 $37,500 $48,500 $53,000
Vancouver $38,500 $42,500 $52,000 $64,500 $68,500
Kelowna $27,000 $33,500 $42,000 $50,500 $58,000
Kamloops $30,000 $33,000 $40,000 $50,500 $58,000
Vernon $23,000 $29,500 $37,000 $44,000 $50,500
Victoria $30,500 $35,500 $46,000 $64,000 $71,500
Prince George $25,000 $29,500 $35,500 $38,500 $44,000

See our Glossary for definitions.

For buildings managed by BC Housing, in order to be eligible your household assets must be less than $100,000. BC Housing’s asset policy has been developed to benefit those in greatest need and to prevent people from having to deplete all of their resources.

Individual non-profit or co-operative housing providers will decide if they are going to apply an asset ceiling and the maximum allowable assets may vary by provider. 

Assets that are included for valuation are:

  •  Stocks, bonds, term deposits, mutual funds and cash.
  •  Real estate equity, net of debt.
  •  Business equity in a private incorporated company including cash, GICs, bonds, stocks or real estate equity.   

Assets that are excluded from valuation include:

  •  Personal effects such as vehicles, jewellery and furniture.
  •  Bursaries or scholarships from educational institutions for any household member that is a current student.
  • Registered Education Savings Plans (RESPs), Registered Retirement Saving Plans (RRSPs), and Registered Disability Savings Plans (RDSPs.) 
  •  Trade and business tools essential to continue currently active employment, such as farm equipment, specialized tools and vehicles.
  •  Assets derived from compensatory packages from government, for example Indian Residential School Settlements and Japanese Canadian Redress.  

Potential exclusion criteria – Applicants may be excluded from consideration for The Housing Registry if any of the following apply:

  • Unsatisfactory tenancy history (based on landlord references (see below), receipt of notices to end tenancies, or review of past tenancies in subsidized housing).
  • Provision of false or fraudulent information.
  • Failure to provide documents as requested, or consent as needed to verify information provided and to determine eligibility.
  • Unable to demonstrate an ability to pay rent and/or failure to apply for and receive income from income programs, such as, but not limited to, the Ministry of Social Development or the Canada Pension Plan.
  • Debt to a subsidized housing provider in B.C. (see section f)
  • Do not meet residency requirements.  
  • Unable to live independently   with supports.
  • Do not meet defined household groups (as defined in section a).
  • Deliberately worsened current housing situation.
  • Demonstration of unacceptable behaviours either in relation to a tenancy or in the community at large that may threaten the health, safety or right of peaceful enjoyment of a community by others. 
  • If there is cause to believe that a household member is engaging in or has a history of criminal activity that may threaten the health, safety or right of peaceful enjoyment of the community by others, including the manufacturing or production of illegal drugs.

Note: Applicants who may be potentially excluded based on any of the above will be provided with an opportunity to provide additional information and/or documentation in support of their application to demonstrate suitability as a potential tenant. Each application and supporting documents shall be evaluated on its own merit.


Mandatory exclusion criteria

The Housing Registry will not accept applications from individuals or members of a household that have been convicted of or who have outstanding charges related to sexual interference with a child and/or possession of child pornography.

Housing Registry members wish to maximize the use of limited available affordable housing by matching eligible applicants to units that meet their needs, in a community where they can be appropriately supported in order to provide them with the best chance of a successful tenancy while cultivating communities free from fear of violence, criminal activity and disturbances of any nature that pose a risk to others.


Demonstrated unacceptable behaviours

Applicants who have demonstrated any of the following unacceptable behaviours either in relation to a tenancy or in the community at large may be excluded from consideration unless they can provide additional information and/or documentation in support of their application to demonstrate suitability as a potential tenant. Each application and supporting documents shall be evaluated on their own merit.

  • Anti-Social Behaviours – Actions that have caused an unreasonable disturbance or form of harassment to other persons, or damage to property. Examples may include, but are not limited to, verbal abuse, harassment, vandalism, theft of property, racial abuse, prostitution, throwing objects likely to cause harm, substance misuse (illegal substances), and unintentional fires.

  • Risks to Life Safety Behaviours – Actions that have endangered that person’s own safety or the safety of others or that have created a tangible risk to the applicant or to other persons and/or property. Examples include, but are not limited to violence of any nature, murder or manslaughter, drug trafficking, weapons offences, arson, criminal harassment, sexual assault (formally known as rape), physical assault (with or without a weapon), threats to kill or cause physical harm, vandalism to life safety systems, theft with violence or threats, kidnapping, unlawful confinement, and/or home invasions. This would also include identification by law enforcement as participants in gang related activity, regardless of conviction for the activity.

  • Nuisance Behaviours – Actions that would be considered a breach of the Tenancy Agreement that are not Risks to Life Safety or Anti-Social Behaviours. Examples may include, but are not limited to, noise nuisance, cleanliness issues that cause smells/pests/health issues, smoking or drinking alcohol under age or in restricted areas, substance misuse (non-illegal substances), begging.

Information on what an applicant needs to provide in order to be considered for housing when there are unacceptable behaviours linked to a past tenancy can be found by reading the next section (below): landlord references.

Applications being reviewed based on demonstrated risk to life safety, anti-social, nuisance behaviours and/or criminal activity, not linked to a past tenancy, may be considered if:

  • Applicant can provide written certification that the offending household member(s) is/are no longer a part of the household; or

  • Five years or more have elapsed since conviction, time served, and probation or parole for criminal activities that may threaten the health, safety or right of peaceful enjoyment of the community for others.

  • Offending household member(s) is/are able to certify corrective actions taken to change unacceptable behaviours such as satisfactory evidence of participation in or receiving services through a supported housing program.


Landlord reference

Most housing providers perform landlord reference checks when they are reviewing applicants for future available units. If you do not have a landlord reference, some housing providers may consider other references such as:

  • A professional reference from someone who has known you for a reasonable period of time and who can vouch for your suitability as a tenant. This could include an employer, social worker, physician, pharmacist, advocate or case manager;

  • A personal reference from someone who has known you for a reasonable period of time, and who can vouch for your suitability as a tenant.

  • Proof of completion of the RentSmart program through Ready to Rent BC. RentSmart is a 12 hour course that covers a range of topics to assist participants in getting and maintaining housing. More information on the course and course availability can be on their website: www.readytorentbc.org

Applicants, who have been identified as potentially not eligible due to an unsatisfactory tenancy history, will be asked to provide a current and verifiable landlord reference(s) demonstrating that they have maintained a successful tenancy with no reoccurrence of the behaviours demonstrated in past tenancies. The landlord reference(s) must cover a minimum of six months for nuisance behaviours and a minimum of twelve months for anti-social or life safety behaviours.

Tenants who previously lived in subsidized housing may be eligible to reapply, provided they meet the residency, income limit and target group criteria, as well as the following special criteria:

  • Applicants must have no outstanding debt from any previous tenancy with BC Housing or any members of the Housing Registry.* Applicants with outstanding debt will be asked to pay in full, or enter into a repayment plan for the outstanding amount.

  • Previous subsidized housing tenants may be subject to a file review. If the previous tenancy was ended for cause, applicants may not be eligible to reapply. Files will be reviewed on a case-by-case basis.  

*To find out which subsidized housing developments are managed by members of the Housing Registry see Housing Listings.

Use the Housing Listings to find subsidized housing in B.C. There are two ways that you can apply to buildings and the Housing Listings will let you know for each building what the application process is. You will need to apply for each building by either:

  1. Applying to The Housing Registry. The Registry allows your single application form to be considered for available units managed by BC Housing and a number of non-profit and co-operative housing providers that have chosen to use The Housing Registry database.
  2. Apply directly to non-profit societies and co-operatives that manage their own application processes.

Note:

  • Housing Listings is not a list of buildings with vacancies.
  • The Housing Listings also includes Affordable Rental Housing where rents are not based on income but are set equal to, or lower than, average private market rents in the community.

​How to use The Housing Listings

  1. Go to Housing Listings.
  2. Enter where you want to live, and then select the minimum and maximum number of bedrooms you need. Click Search.
  3. Under Refine your results you can narrow your search results.
  4. View the list. For more information on the buildings that interest you, click View Building Details.
  5. In Building Details, under How to Apply, you can see if applications are accepted by The Housing Registry or if you need to apply directly to the housing provider.
  6. You can make a note of the How to Apply Information:
    The Housing Registry – make a note of the Building Code to include it on your application; or
    The phone number, address, email or website address for applying directly to a housing provider.

Tip:To increase your chances of obtaining a unit, apply to all of the buildings that meet your needs.

The Housing Registry is a centralized database, managed by BC Housing, of applicants in search of subsidized housing. The Registry allows your single application form to be considered for available units managed by BC Housing and a number of non-profit and co-operative housing providers that have chosen to use The Housing Registry database.

You must complete an application for the Housing Registry. There are two ways to apply: you can either apply online using the button below or obtain a paper application.

Apply Online

Paper application process

If you are not completing an application online, you must download and complete the Housing Registry Application Form. If you can't download the form, you may have the form mailed to you or pick one up in person:

  • Complete the online request form to have the form mailed to you.
  • Call us toll-free at 1-800-257-7756 or call 604-433-2218 in the Lower Mainland to have the form mailed to you.
  • Go to any BC Housing office or Housing Registry access point to pick up the form.

Next, you must fill out all of the information on the form, and either fax or mail it to your local BC Housing Office. Lower Mainland residents can drop off applications in Burnaby:

BC Housing Home Office, Suite 101-4555 Kingsway, Burnaby, BC V5H 4V8

Applicants in special circumstances

Some housing providers give additional consideration to households that are at risk of homelessness, at risk of violence and/or have a serious health condition that is affected by their current housing. Applicants who meet these criteria may consider having a Housing Registry Supplemental Form completed by someone who can verify their situation.

Download the Supplemental Application Form

Not all non-profit societies and co-operatives use The Housing Registry as their applicant database, so to increase your chances of securing subsidized housing, we recommend that you apply directly to these non-profit societies and co-operatives.

Sometimes you may find that non-profit and co-operative housing providers are not accepting new applications because of the number of applicants already on their applicant lists. These applicant lists re-open as vacancies become available, so check back with the housing provider.

Many housing co-operatives will provide information on whether they are accepting applications on the Co-operative Housing Federation of BC’s website.

Once you have applied to non-profit and co-operative housing providers, make sure that you keep your application up-to-date.

When will I receive an offer for subsidized housing?
The demand for subsidized housing far exceeds the available supply. As a result, it is not possible to predict when a unit may come available. Wait times depend on the number of unit turnovers and the needs of other households applying for housing. To increase your chances of obtaining a unit, select a range of developments with The Housing Registry and apply directly to developments that are not part of the registry.

Housing needs categories
BC Housing places applicants into one of five categories, with priority based on the urgency of their housing need:

  • Applicants facing a severe risk to health and/or safety, such as homelessness or living in a homeless shelter.

  • Applicants with serious health/medical/social needs, such as risk of homelessness, fleeing domestic abuse, living in severely inadequate housing, or transitioning to a more independent living situation.

  • Applicants whose housing need is moderate compared with the two previous categories, such as living in temporary or inadequate accommodation.

  • Applicants with a specialized housing need or low housing need, such as living in marginally crowded housing.

  • Applicants for the low end market units found in some subsidized buildings.

In each category, applicants are listed in order of the date they apply.

Priority for public housing units managed by BC Housing is provided to people with the greatest need. Some non-profit and co-operative housing providers may use other selection methods. Check with each group to find out how they select tenants.


Keep your application up to date

Now that you've completed the application process, you must keep your application up to date. To make sure your application stays active, try to update your application:

  • Once every six months
  • Whenever any of your information changes

Please provide day and evening phone numbers, or the phone number of a contact person, so housing providers can contact you if a unit becomes available.

If BC Housing does not hear from an applicant for over six months, his or her application will be put on hold and a card requesting an update will be mailed to the last known address. If there is no response or the card is returned, the application will be cancelled and the applicant may need to complete a new application in order to be considered for housing in the future.

To update your application:

  • By phone: Call The Housing Registry Inquiry Line at 604-433-2218, or 1-800-257-7756 outside the Lower Mainland.
  • By fax: Fax a letter with your name, file number, previous information, and new information to The Housing Registry at 604-439-4729.
  • By mail: Mail a letter with your name, file number, previous information, and new information to The Housing Registry at:
    BC Housing Home Office, 101-4555 Kingsway, Burnaby, BC  V5H 4V8. Office hours: 8:30am to 4:30pm.
  • In person: Letters can also be dropped off at your local BC Housing office.

Note: If you are in the Lower Mainland, please drop off your letter at the BC Housing Home Office address listed above. Do not drop off applications at Fraser Region or Vancouver Coastal Region offices.

 

If you applied directly with non-profit and co-operative housing providers that manage their own applicant lists, ask them how you can keep your file up to date and how often they want you to contact them.

If you applied to The Housing Registry, you must keep your application up to date by contacting The Housing Registry at least once every six months. Contact us immediately if any of your information has changed.  This includes if:  

  • You change your phone number, email address or mailing address
  • Your rent or income increases or decreases
  • Your health or relationship status changes
  • Your household size changes

Please try to provide both day and evening phone numbers, or the phone number of a contact person, so housing providers can contact you if a unit becomes available.

If we don’t hear from you, or are unsuccessful in trying to reach you, your application will be put on hold and we will send you a request to renew in the mail.  If there is no response, or the mail is returned, the application will be cancelled and you may need to complete a new application to be considered for housing in the future.

Update your application one of three ways:

  • In person: Visit a BC Housing office. Bring your Housing Registry file number
  • By mail: Write a letter with your name, file number and any new information to: The Housing Registry, BC Housing, 101-4555 Kingsway, Burnaby, BC, V5H 4V8
  • By fax: 604-439-4729

  • A third-party verifier must be familiar with the applicant’s current housing circumstance and/or health situation and housing needs.
  • A third-party verifier cannot be the applicant’s private market landlord, friend, neighbour or a relative of the applicant.
  • Please note that The Housing Registry does not reimburse third-party verifiers for completing a Supplemental Application Form.
  • For a list of accepted third-party verifiers, please see below. For more information, call our Inquiry Line at 604-433-2218, or toll-free at 1-800-257-7756.
Situation Type Accepted Verifer
Fleeing domestic violence/abuse Clergy
Outreach worker
Court official
Lawyer
Ministry of Child Family Development Social Worker
Registered Nurse/Psychiatric Nurse
Occupational Therapist
Physician
Law Enforcement Officer
Settlement worker
Shelter Worker
Stopping The Violence Counsellor
Transition House, Second Stage and Safe Home Worker
Teacher or Other School Official
Victim Support Worker (police and community based and domestic violence unit, domestic violence response team)
Homelessness Clergy
Drug and Alcohol Counsellor
Outreach Worker
Court Official
Lawyer
Ministry of Child and Family Development Social Worker
Ministry of Social Development – Employment and Assistance Worker
Registered Nurse/Psychiatric Nurse
Occupational Therapist
Physician
Law Enforcement Officer
Settlement worker
Shelter Worker
Transition house, second stage and safe home worker
Teacher or other school official
Serious health conditions affected by current housing Registered Social Worker
Physician
Occupational Therapist
Registered Nurse/Psychiatric Nurse

Other situations

Verifiers not listed above may be considered case-by-case based on their ability to demonstrate familiarity with the applicant’s current housing circumstance and/or health situation and housing needs. Some examples:

Situation Possible verifier
Homeless due to human-caused or natural disaster Fire Department
Newspaper articles
Children can not live with applicant until stable housing is found Copies of court documents
Ministry of Children and Family Development worker
Current accommodation is unsuitable for a child with special needs Ministry of Children and Family Development worker
School counsellor
Frequent moves are affecting minor children Ministry of Children and Family Development worker
School counsellor
Have an extremely long commute long commute to work or school that cannot be sustained Letter from employer confirming employment location and hours of work Proof of enrollment in full-time day attendance at recognized educational institution
Other circumstances or a combination of circumstances that relate to the safety/security of a tenant Verification by police or other appropriate agency clearly stating how continued residence in current accommodation or community is putting applicant or member of household at risk

 

What kind of housing can I apply for?
You can apply for different types of affordable housing:

  • BC Housing manages 7,800 units of public housing.
  • Non-profit societies manage affordable housing, with subsidies from BC Housing.
  • Housing co-operatives also run affordable housing developments, with funding from BC Housing.

As the demand for housing exceeds the number of available units, it is not possible to predict when an applicant may receive an offer of accommodation.
Different housing providers often have different criteria for prioritizing applicants, examples include:

  • Chronological – by date of application
  • A point system used to determine which applicants are in the greatest need
  • Housing Need Categories

Housing co-operatives accept new members based on their willingness to participate in running the co-operative. Some housing providers may give additional consideration to applicants who are: homeless; fleeing domestic violence or abuse; or have a serious health condition affected by their current housing. If this applies to you, you may wish to have a Supplemental Form completed by a third party verifier.

When will I get an offer for housing?

The demand for subsidized housing far exceeds the available supply. As a result, it is not possible to predict when a unit may come available. Wait times depend on the number of unit turnovers and the needs of other households applying for housing. To increase your chances of obtaining a unit, select a range of developments with The Housing Registry and apply directly to developments that are not part of the registry.

When you are being considered for a vacant unit, the housing provider will call you for more information. At this time, the housing provider will perform additional validations and checks to determine if they will offer you an available unit. Each housing provider will have their own process for reviewing and evaluating applications for possible tenancies.

Applicant evaluation processes may include:        

  • Personal interviews
  • Verification of information provided on your application
  • Completion of searches of websites in the public domain (Court Services Online or police department websites)
  • Requesting your consent for completion of a Credit Check or Criminal Records Check
  • Requesting your consent to gather information from Service Providers
  • Completion of Reference Checks  

If you are offered an available unit, you will normally be provided the opportunity to view the unit or a similar unit before making a decision. Remember to keep your housing registry application updated with current contact information.

If you are offered a rent-geared-to-income unit, the amount you will pay depends on the size of your family and your gross household income. If you are offered a low-end of market unit, you will pay an amount set at, or slightly below, private market rents. View information on rent-geared-to-income and market housing. Some housing developments may have other charges. View the Housing Listings for notes about other charges or expenses.
For example, some other charges may include:

  • Security deposit – A security deposit is held by the landlord and will be returned when your tenancy ends, if there has been no damage to the unit.
  • Pet deposit – In buildings that allow pets, pet owners may be required to pay a pet deposit.
  • Co-operative share – New co-operative members must buy a membership share to join a co-operative, similar to a security deposit. The cost of a co-operative share will vary. The share amount will be returned when you leave the co-operative, if there are no debts or damages to the unit.
  • Other charges may include:
    • Cable television
    • Laundry
    • Parking
    • Utilities (gas and hydro)

Disabled for income tax purposes can be demonstrated by receiving the disability tax credit on the previous year's income tax return or by providing a copy of a letter from Canada Revenue Agency confirming that you have been approved for the Disability Tax Credit.

There are three types of subsidized housing available to seniors and adults with disabilities.

  1. Independent Housing – existing units.
  2. Independent Housing – new – these are Seniors' Rental Housing units that have been added since November 2010.
  3. Independent housing with services (meals and housekeeping) – these are Seniors' Supportive Housing units.

The application process is identical for all of these unit types. 

An unmarried child, stepchild, adopted child or legal ward, mainly supported by the applicant, who is:

  • Under 19 years of age; or
  • Under 25 years of age and registered in full-time school, university or vocational institute which provides a recognized diploma, certificate, or degree; or
  • Of any age who, because of mental or physical infirmity, is accepted as a dependent for income tax purposes.

Note: Some housing providers may have different criteria about what constitutes a dependent child.

Applicants must permanently reside in British Columbia when applying, and each member of the household must be one of the following:

  • Canadian citizen
  • Individual lawfully admitted into Canada for permanent residence
  • Refugee sponsored by the Government of Canada
  • Individual who has applied for refugee status

No adult members of the household can be under private sponsorship, except where BC Housing has accepted that private sponsorship has broken down.

Applicants who can independently maintain their personal health and well-being in a self-contained living unit and who can fulfill tenancy obligations including paying rent, caring for their unit and maintaining appropriate relations with neighbours.

Applicants who require supports to live independently will be considered if they are able to demonstrate that the required supports are available in the community. Low-income seniors or people with disabilities who need assistance in order to live independently can apply for specially modified rental homes, in selected subsidized housing developments.

The size of unit required by a household is governed by the National Occupancy Standards. Please refer to section 2. Am I eligible? c) Your household income must be below certain limits for more details for more information.

Most housing providers perform landlord reference checks when they are reviewing applicants for future available units. If you do not have a landlord reference, some housing providers may consider other references such as:

  • A professional reference from someone who has known you for a reasonable period of time and who can vouch for your suitability as a tenant. This could include an employer, social worker, physician, pharmacist, advocate or case manager.
  • A personal reference from someone who has known you for a reasonable period of time, and who can vouch for your suitability as a tenant.
  • Proof of completion of the RentSmart program through Ready to Rent BC. RentSmart is a 12 hour course that covers a range of topics to assist participants in getting and maintaining housing. More information on the course and course availability can be on their website.

Applicants, who have been identified as potentially not eligible due to an unsatisfactory tenancy history, will be asked to provide a current and verifiable landlord reference(s) demonstrating that they have maintained a successful tenancy with no reoccurrence of the behaviours demonstrated in past tenancies. The landlord reference(s) must cover a minimum of six months for nuisance behaviours and a minimum of twelve months for anti-social or life safety behaviours.